Psalm 24

 
Psalm 24
Jehovah of Hosts, the King of Glory
 
Psalm 24. This is another Psalm of David, and it is one of the most dramatic and exciting Psalms in the Psalter. The suffering servant of Psalm 22, the Shepherd that cared for them in the path, is now shown to be Jehovah Himself, the King of Glory, over all the earth. It is a Millennial psalm, and it focuses on two things: (1) the character of the remnant who will ascend into the mount of Jehovah and stand in His holy place, and (2) welcoming Jehovah Himself, in the Person of the Messiah, into the gates of Jerusalem. It is interesting that this Psalm is not addressed to God, but to Israel and the nations who seek Israel’s blessing (v.6).
 
PSALM 24
Of David. A Psalm.
1 The earth is Jehovah’s, and the fulness thereof; the world, and they that dwell therein.
2 For it was he that founded it upon seas, and established it upon floods.
3 Who shall ascend into the mount of Jehovah? and who shall stand in his holy place?
4 He that hath blameless hands and a pure heart; who lifteth not up his soul unto vanity, nor sweareth deceitfully:
5 He shall receive blessing from Jehovah, and righteousness from the God of his salvation.
6 This is the generation of them that seek unto him, that seek thy face, O Jacob. Selah.
 
vv.1-6 The Generation that Seek Jehovah. In vv.1-2 we have the universal dominion of Jehovah which will be manifest in the kingdom. This is the answer to the contest of the great tribulation; “Who does the earth belong to?” The earth-dwellers, led by the beast and antichrist, laid claim to it, but in the Millennium it will be manifested who really owns the earth and its fullness. This brings out the majesty of God! Then in vv.3-4 we have the requirements for those who will stand in the presence of Jehovah in His Millennial temple; “He that hath blameless hands and a pure heart; who lifteth not up his soul unto vanity, nor sweareth deceitfully”. Then in v.5 we have the reward for the the remnant; they will be blessed and receive a righteous reward. In v.6 we see that this Psalm is really Israel speaking to herself and other nations; “O Jacob”. Israel is reminding all mankind of the greatness of Jehovah, the requirements for those who seek His presence, and for those who seek Israel’s true destiny. Notice the use of the term “generation”, and compare with Psalm 22:30-31.
 
7 Lift up your heads, ye gates, and be ye lifted up, ye everlasting doors, and the King of glory shall come in.
8 Who is this King of glory? Jehovah strong and mighty, Jehovah mighty in battle.
9 Lift up your heads, ye gates; yea, lift up, ye everlasting doors, and the King of glory shall come in.
10 Who is he, this King of glory? Jehovah of hosts, he is the King of glory. Selah. 
 
vv.7-10 Welcoming the King of Glory. As the Psalm continues, Israel announces to itself, specifically Jerusalem, that Jehovah is ready to enter its gates. Christ is the King of glory, Jehovah in the flesh, and He enters the gates of His city in the dignity of His Person, in all His official glory. This will take place after the last of the confederacies of men have been defeated (Zech. 14). He enters it as a victorious and glorious King, “strong and mighty”. The heads of Jerusalem’s gates have been long bowed in humiliation and defeat, but now they are called upon to lift themselves up in exultation, that the King of Glory might come in! What a glorious moment! In v.10 the question is raised rhetorically, “Who is he, this King of glory?” The answer “Jehovah of hosts, he is the King of glory”. The name “Jehovah of Hosts” implies Christ at the head of all the armies of heaven and earth; perhaps similar to the title “King of kings, and Lord of lords”. Notice how frequently that title is used in Zechariah! And then the word “Selah” is used, which indicates a pause for for meditation.